Yale Linus Smart Lock: Test, Spces, Price, Release

[ad_1]


The Yale Linus Smart Lock does its job well and reliably. The intelligent attachment opens and closes the front door via app, voice control and, if desired, fully automatically as soon as the residents come home or leave the house. Thanks to access authorization for guests and service providers, the Yale lock is also suitable as a smart doorman. Advantage compared to the competition from Nuki: It looks less rickety and turns the key much quieter – only a subtle humming can be heard. But the Linus is more expensive than Nuki (199 euros) at a purchase price of 250 euros and so far only offers the most essential accessories: In addition to the bridge for remote access (80 euros), there is a keypad for 70 euros. Nuki has more to offer, such as an “opener” for apartment buildings or a “Fob” radio remote control.

Per

  • Solid, made entirely of metal
  • Easy installation and operation
  • Auto-unlock function

Cons

  • A little clunky
  • Registration requires phone number
  • Some functions only via bridge

Editor’s assessment

Well

W.When he returns home with the child in his arms or packed with shopping bags, he often wants a third hand to find the key and unlock the front door. The Smart Lock “Linus” from Yale does not deliver that either. However, if you wish, it unlocks the door fully automatically as soon as you approach the entrance – and also has some other smart functions in store. This should not only ensure convenience, but also increase security. Is that really true?

Linus in the test: a lock that can be clipped on

What is special about the Linus Smart Lock: It is an attachment that sits on the inside of the door fitting – without any dowels or drilling. In future, a battery-powered motor will turn the key in the lock. In the test, assembly required little effort, was completed in under five minutes, and your own door lock remains intact: Simply place the retaining plate supplied on the existing lock cylinder, fix it with the two small screws, insert the key and put the Yale lock over it. Sits bombproof. If the cylinder does not protrude far enough out of the door fitting, an adhesive pad is included with which the mounting plate is glued to the lock. If that still doesn’t work, Yale can offer a lock cylinder specially designed for the Linus at an additional cost. The lock is a bit bulky, but simple in appearance. It is made entirely of metal and is solidly made – and looks a bit more valuable than the competition from Nuki.



Yale Smart Lock in the test: download the app, make it smart

Use the “Yale Access” app for iOS and Android to operate the door lock on your mobile phone. Annoying: You need a user account to set up your email address and phone number – you can’t do without it! Once that is done, the lock is calibrated by locking and unlocking it several times. With a lock cylinder that can be turned from the outside and inside at the same time, you can still unlock the door from the outside with a key. The batteries supplied supply the Smart Lock with power. They are cleverly hidden under the magnetic lid, which also houses the required QR codes. Good: The Yale app reminds you in good time when the juice is running low and it needs to be replaced.

Linus makes the key superfluous

The lock connects to the smartphone via Bluetooth (LE) and can be conveniently controlled using the Yale app: the front door opens or closes with a tap on the display. From the inside, turning the top of the bolt is enough to operate the lock. Too complicated? Not smart enough? Then activate the “Auto Unlock” function of the app. Using the GPS signal, she recognizes the smartphone as soon as it is nearby and promptly opens the door. That worked quite reliably. As soon as the testers approached the lock with their cell phones in their pockets, Linus locked the door. Good: The hum of the motor is much quieter than with Nuki. If desired, the lock also pulls the latch so that the door is not only unlocked, but also swings open a little. A function like “Lock’n’Go”, in which the Nuki lock automatically locks when entering or leaving the apartment as soon as the door is slammed, does not exist with the Linus.



Guests and voice assistants are also welcome

The mother-in-law comes earlier than agreed or the craftsman is at the door and nobody is home? The Linus has a smart solution for this: virtual keys can be distributed via the Yale app. To do this, guests or service providers have to accept the invitation and download the Yale app to their mobile phones. The access authorization can either be used at all times or the homeowner only issues it once or regularly at certain times. The app documents the entry and exit of the authorized persons, so that both are comprehensible for the residents. Those who prefer to stay in control can operate the door lock themselves while on the move. The Yale Connect WiFi bridge is required for remote control. The small white plastic cube goes into the socket and connects the Smart Lock to the home WiFi. This then also allows notifications outside of your own four walls or voice assistance. The Linus understands Amazon Alexa, the Google Assistant and Apple’s Siri. Linked to this, opening works on demand or via scenes such as “Hey Alexa, good night”. The door can now be locked when the lights and music are switched off. Also smart: a door sensor that checks the status of the Smart Lock (unlocked / locked) and that of the door (open / closed). A small magnet glued to the door frame helps. The Yale app warns, for example, if the door is ajar when locking.

The best surveillance cameras

Is such a smart lock also safe?

Generally, yes. The risk of break-in is in practice no higher with a Smart Lock than with a “dumb” lock. Because: No change can be seen on the outside – nobody can see that a Smart Lock has been installed. In any case, the lock itself is usually not the target of burglars. You’re more likely to pry open the door. Only stable door fittings and locking bolts can help. These functions provide additional security:

  • The Bluetooth connection (low energy) is encrypted according to the manufacturer – just as strong as with online banking. The Yale Access account is protected by two-factor authentication.
  • The front door can still be unlocked with a key despite the Smart Lock. Lost your radio key or smartphone? No problem: the Yale app and virtual keys can be reset at any time.
  • Networked door locks should allow residents and guests into the house more easily. They only get access for the time of their visit – via the Yale app or their own door code. This guarantees that no key is lost. If a stranger sees the access code, you can easily change it using the app.
  • Ask Alexa or Siri to open the front door from outside? Doesn’t work for strangers! To do this, the paired mobile phone must be unlocked or a PIN query must be answered.

Yale Linus Smart Lock: test result, products, prices

The Yale Linus Smart Lock does its job well and reliably. The intelligent attachment opens and closes the front door via app, voice control and, if desired, fully automatically as soon as the residents come home or leave the house. Thanks to access authorization for guests and service providers, the Yale lock is also suitable as a smart doorman. Advantage compared to the competition from Nuki: It looks less rickety and turns the key much quieter – only a subtle humming can be heard. On the other hand, the Linus is more expensive than Nuki (199 euros) at a purchase price of 250 euros and so far only offers the most essential accessories: In addition to the bridge for remote access (80 euros), there is a keypad for 70 euros. Nuki has more to offer, such as an “opener” for apartment buildings or a “Fob” radio remote control.

[ad_2]

Leave a Reply