Cacheman: Test of the Windows memory optimizer – COMPUTER PICTURE

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Cacheman: Windows 10 optimize with profiles

Cacheman in the test: the memory optimizer is good for it Software like Cacheman doesn't necessarily need it, but it is "nice to have".

Cacheman is rich in features, largely clear and works reliably.

Shovel free memory

The free trial version is convincing apart from the unusable profiles with a large range of functions: At the top, Cacheman visualizes the load on your processor cores and RAM. Probably the most important function is “Recover RAM”: With this the software scooped up memory in the test: Initially 4.2 of 8 gigabytes (GB) of RAM were occupied, then only 2.7 GB. The reduction of the memory load of individual programs also worked reliably: As with the Windows Task Manager, the processes running in the background are listed. With chrome.exe marked, the context command “Reduce RAM consumption” created around 40 megabytes of free memory. Another function that the Windows Task Manager does not offer is “Restart process”: Programs that run unstable are reloaded into the RAM. If you load with a new PID (process ID), unsaved content, for example in the Notepad editor, is lost. It is questionable whether the features mentioned so far provide more speed. A performance injection may offer permanent optimizations: With “Core affinity (sticky)” you assign CPU cores to a process, with “Set priority (sticky)” you assign a performance level like “High”. The tuning is not lost when the process is terminated and restarted. Windows cannot do this.

Cacheman Review: More Features

With Cacheman you check the main memory (where the cache is located) for errors, for which you start the on-board tool mdsched with a click. With the disk cleanup you clean up your hard drive / SSD. On the “Performance Tweaks” tab you also change the system settings: Uncheck “Indexing Service”, this deactivates the “Windows Search” system service. A removed hook at “Prefetch /Superfetch “means that Windows no longer uses this caching technology; it is sometimes discredited to brake. The intervention deactivates the SysMain service and changes the value of the registry entries” EnablePrefetcher “and” EnableSuperfetch “from 3 to 0.

75 programs

Delete garbage, defragment and more

Cacheman: test conclusion

Cacheman bundles many useful functions for system optimization. The program is reminiscent of the Task Manager, but goes further in terms of depth. The tool did not make our test device noticeably faster, but created more free RAM memory without much effort. With Process Lasso, for example, you can get changed process settings to apply permanently, but the tool does not have eleven “auto-optimization” profiles. Ten of them are idle in the Cacheman demo, it only provides “Basic Optimization” for free. Cacheman not only brings Windows more stability, but is also quite stable itself; the alternative MzRAM booster sometimes showed error messages on Windows 10 devices. However, instead of running in 64-bit mode, Cacheman only runs with 32-bit processes: This applies to the Cacheman Control Panel and the Cacheman Tray Icons. With PCMark 10 we checked whether the basic profile improves the performance (notebook with i7 CPU, 8 GB RAM, SSD): In three runs before the optimization and in three further runs afterwards, the results were close together within the scope of the measurement inaccuracy . The program does not turn lame PCs into a rocket, but is recommended for lovers of RAM tuning due to the range of functions. Anyone who expects significant performance gains will be disappointed. The software is mature due to the long development time. German-language help would be desirable for a future version: Although it is praiseworthy that a help function including a search function is available, German-language explanations would make it easier for laypeople to access.

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