4K monitor test: models in comparison – COMPUTER BILD

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ZGranted, an Excel spreadsheet doesn’t look any more exciting on a 4K monitor. But such a high-resolution screen has other advantages. It gives columns, diagrams, but of course photos and films more sharpness. Because the screens are often slightly larger, 4K monitors also offer more space on the desktop. The best news, however, is that you no longer have to spend a fortune to get one of the sharp displays in your home office. Cheap models start at 300 euros. A comparison is still worthwhile, because there are differences not only in terms of price but also in terms of equipment.

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4K monitors in the test: that’s what 4K, 8K or HDR stand for

Cheap monitors are mostly full HD models. They show 1920×1080 pixels. A 4K monitor shows four times as many pixels (3840×2160 pixels). The designation 4K is derived from the number of pixels in an image line: 3,840 is rounded up to full thousands (4), K stands for the prefix kilo (thousand). The abbreviation UHD (for Ultra High Definition) is used less often for 4K monitors than for televisions, but it also stands for a resolution of 3840×2160 pixels.

4K monitors in the test: This is how much the monitors cost


4K monitors tested: the picture is great!

Fujitsu P27-8 TS UHD

Fujitsi P27-8 TS UHD © Fujitsu

Good picture, good equipment – the Fujitsi P27-8 TS UHD is the best in the test.

An (almost) perfect mix: super sharp thanks to 4K resolution (3840×2160 pixels), beautifully bright and rich in contrast, the whole thing combined with high color fidelity and good features – many connections and many adjustment options. Also great: the low power consumption.

4K monitors in the test: nice and bright


4K monitors put to the test: speed at image construction

The Acer Predator XB273KP shows the most frames per second, it manages up to 144 frame changes per second (with reduced resolution), in 4K there are up to 120 frames per second possible. This is only worthwhile when gaming, for office programs and when watching videos, the usual 60 frames per second are sufficient (and you don’t need an extra graphics card for this). A higher speed requires an extremely fast graphics card, even top models like that Geforce RTX 2080 Super break a sweat. For conventional 4K monitors, on the other hand, much cheaper graphics cards, such as the Geforce 2060 Super or the Radeon RX 5700 XT, are sufficient.

Acer Predator XB273P

Acer Predator XB273KP © Acer

Pretty expensive, but also pretty fast – the Acer Predator XB273KP is a dream monitor for gamers.

The Acer Predator XB273KP is pretty expensive! There is an extra-bright monitor with almost perfect color reproduction and an extra-high refresh rate: the monitor can display up to 144 images per second – ideal for gaming when the appropriate super-fast graphics card is in the computer. Good: The Predator has plenty of connections and can be adjusted in many ways. It only has two small weaknesses: the screen illumination is not perfectly even and the power consumption is generous at almost 68 watts

4K monitors put to the test: not always economical

The elaborate display technology in the 4K monitors can be quite noticeable in terms of power consumption: The Acer Predator XB273KP consumes just under 68 watts. The Fujitsu P27-8 TS UHD, on the other hand, is satisfied with 26 watts. Little more than full HD monitors, which in the current test by COMPUTER BILD for the 20 watts in operation consumed. Almost all tested 4K monitors are economical in standby: they consumed less than 0.4 watts in standby mode. Only Acer Predator XB273KP should be disconnected from the mains (e.g. with a switch socket strip) if it is not used for a long time. He swallowed a full 28 watts in standby.

Philips Brilliance BDM4037UW



The Philips offers a screen diagonal of around 102 centimeters for PC monitors. But the 4K Philips is not only big, but also beautiful: in the test, it offered brilliant image reproduction with high color fidelity. In addition, its features are unrivaled thanks to the USB hub and many connections.

4K monitors put to the test: there is often a lack of operation

A 4K monitor is (almost) self-explanatory, apparently many manufacturers think and usually only pack one quick start Guide in the box. The outlined instructions may often suffice to connect the stand to the screen part and to connect the cables correctly, but help in printed form for the operating menus would be desirable. Because some of them are quite nested and sometimes cause frustration during the initial setup – even with the testers! Only two of the tested 4K monitors, the LG 27UD59-B and the Philips Brilliance BDM4037UW, earned the title “comfortable”. Only the Fujitsu P27-8 TS UHD achieved a “very comfortable” rating.

4K monitors put to the test: the image signal comes digital

4K monitors put to the test: many adjustment options

Anyone who works at the screen for hours should be able to adjust the incline and height exactly to their needs. All test candidates can be adjusted in inclination, but a monitor base is better Height adjustment like the Acer Predator XB273KP, the Fujitsu P27-8 TS UHD and the LG 27UD59P-B. The Acer and Fujitsu also offer a rotatable monitor base. Frequent writers and programmers are particularly happy about one Pivot function: The Fujitsu and the LG can be rotated into portrait format.

AOC U2777PQU

AOC U2777PQU © AOC

Affordable 4K monitor with a good picture – the AOC U2777PQU.

The shiny exterior takes some getting used to: the AOC’s display and frame are reflective. The picture quality is top, however, only with the maximum brightness the AOC does not quite reach the values ​​of the 4K competition.

Conclusion: 4K monitors in the test


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