Businessman writes ‘practical playbook’ for affordable shift to ‘Fossil Free’ world


‘Fossil Free’ by Sumant Sinha


Text Size:

New Delhi: An overwhelming dependence on fossil fuels has served as a catalyst for global warming, pushing the Earth to its tipping point. Its impact is not only expected to put global food availability and biodiversity at risk, but also raise sea levels and increase the frequency of extreme weather events such as hurricanes and floods.

In his latest book ‘Fossil Free’, Sumant Sinha, founder of India’s leading clean energy company ReNew Power, seeks to explain how the world can make a practical transition to cleaner sources of energy.

The book, published by HarperCollins India, is due to be released on 12 November on ‘SoftCover’, ThePrint’s e-venue to launch select non-fiction books.

Over the last decade, there has been a major transition to sustainable energy, and Sinha’s book discusses the challenges, realities and complexities of the global and local energy industries. It also delves into the the trends and forces that drive energy transition.

The book explains how improved electricity infrastructure, decentralised smart grids, electric vehicles, energy storage, and market design are already providing clear pathways for the transition to greener energy.

With Fossil Free, Sinha shares his vision for energy that is not only clean, but also practical and affordable.

“Fossil Free chronicles the energy transition taking place around the world, and more importantly, in India. As we move away from fossil fuels to renewable energy, the structure of the energy sector will change irreversibly,” said Sinha.

“India is at the vanguard of this change and the book outlines a ‘carbon-light playbook’ for the country, showing how this energy revolution will create new opportunities for millions of Indians while also addressing the pressing issue of climate change,” he added.


Also read: New book traces why India-China ties have been ‘confrontational’ since 15th century


 

Subscribe to our channels on YouTube & Telegram

Why news media is in crisis & How you can fix it

India needs free, fair, non-hyphenated and questioning journalism even more as it faces multiple crises.

But the news media is in a crisis of its own. There have been brutal layoffs and pay-cuts. The best of journalism is shrinking, yielding to crude prime-time spectacle.

ThePrint has the finest young reporters, columnists and editors working for it. Sustaining journalism of this quality needs smart and thinking people like you to pay for it. Whether you live in India or overseas, you can do it here.

Support Our Journalism